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Archive for November, 2011

Lombard: Twentieth Century Fox

By , 21 November, 2011, 1 Comment

A simple — but heavily image laden — review of Twentieth Century (1934); Carole Lombard at her comedic and lingerie-wearing best. First in a bra and step-ins aka tap pants, then in the classic 1930s glamour gown.

Carole Lombard In Bra & Tap Pants

Carole Lombard 1930s Glamour

Beauty & Hair Tips From The 60s and 70s

By , 19 November, 2011, No Comment

Hair and makeup artist Lexi DeRock has a book helping you get the looks: Decades of Style: A Step-by-Step Hair & Makeup Guide – 60s & 70s. Plus, now through Thanksgiving, she’s giving away one copy a day! She’s also giving 50% off and free shipping to the first 50 people who ask for it!

Decades of Style

Sometimes You Just Can’t Get That Authentic Vintage Look

By , 3 November, 2011, 1 Comment

Sometimes you just can’t replicate the look — not on my budget, anyway. Exhibit A: Peggy Hopkins Joyce.

Peggy Hopkins Joyce

On the back of the vintage photo, the reasons why most of us can’t get this look: “Peggy Hopkins Joyce, star of Earl Carroll’s Vanities of 1923 wearing a $6,000 gown of rhinestones and chinchilla and her million and a half dollars in jewels”.

Description Of Fashions

The seller offers this history on Joyce:

Famous mainly for being famous — and for marrying and divorcing (or merely dating) a dizzying array of millionaires — blonde-bobbed Peggy Hopkins Joyce (born Marguerite Upton) had been in the Follies and Earl Carroll’s Vanities when the famous illustrator James Montgomery Flagg directed her in a series of short subjects in the 1910s. She would descend on Hollywood at intervals in the 1910s, 1920s, and early ’30s but managed mainly to prove that she was no actress. Her most notorious film appearance was also her last, playing an internationally famous gold digger in International House (1933), a hodgepodge Paramount comedy in which she earned top billing over the likes of George Burns, Gracie Allen, and W. C. Fields. The latter supplied the film’s biggest laugh and most notorious moment in a scene that has to be seen to be believed, but which included the suggestive discussion of the whereabouts of a cat. Her life an endless series of tabloid headlines, Peggy Hopkins Joyce is believed to have been the inspiration for the character of the mercenary Lorelei Lee in Anita Loos’ twice-filmed Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. One of her contemporaries perhaps best summed up her appeal; said nightclub hostess Texas Guinan: “Peggy Hopkins Joyce should not be buried like other folks, or cremated, or anything like that, but just be put into Tiffany’s window to sparkle forever.” ~ Hans J. Wollstein, Rovi